Category: Politics

Aneurin Bevan Quote

Aneurin “Nye” Bevan (15 November 1897 – 6 July 1960) was a Welsh Labour Party politician. Born into a working-class family in South Wales, he was the son of a coal miner. He left school at 14 and worked as a miner during his teens where he became involved in local union politics. He was named head of his Miners’ Lodge when aged 19, where he frequently railed against management. He joined the Labour Party and attended Central Labour College in London. On his return to South Wales he struggled to find work, remaining unemployed for nearly three years before gaining employment as a union official, which led to him becoming a leading figure in the 1926 general strike.

In 1928, Bevan won a seat on Monmouthshire County Council and was elected as the MP for Ebbw Vale the following year. In Parliament, he became a vocal critic of numerous other politicians from all parties, including Winston Churchill and David Lloyd George. His criticisms of Churchill and the Conservative government during the Second World War raised him to national prominence.

I think I would have got on well with him.

Prime Greed

New today that at least seven Conservative politicians in the current government are claiming the cost of their Amazon Prime subscription on expenses.

One of those is Liz Truss, the Foreign Secretary and candidate to lead the Conservative Party and become the next Prime Minister. (No pun intended)

Her salary as a Cabinet Minister is £147,000 a year. ($175,000) Yet she has no shame in expecting the taxpayers of Britain to pay for her £79 annual Amazon Prime subscription.

More pigs at the trough, showing their contempt for ordinary people.

Boris Johnson Calls It A Day

The worst Prime Minister in British history (yes, even worse than Thatcher) has finally been pushed out of office following a rebellion by his own ‘friends’. He will tender his resignation today, then try to stay on in the role until a new leader is elected by his party.

Too many lies, too much bluff and bluster, too much corruption, too much embarrassment for the Conservative Party. It has all finally taken it’s toll.

So why am I not dancing for joy?

The other equally corrupt Conservatives are so terrified of what might happen if there is now a General Election have persuaded him to resign to avoid that. So that means a leadership election, followed by another repulsive Tory becoming Prime Minister. Then they wil try to hang on until 2024, hoping to erase Johnson’s tainted legacy in the meantime.

Nothing is going to change. The rich and corrupt will get richer, and continue to be corrupt. Life will be no better for ‘ordinary’ people, and the old Establishment wil continue to tear apart the NHS, Social Services, The Unions, and the living conditions of the working class.

No dancing for joy from me. The face in number ten will change, but everything else will remain the same.

To be honest, I would have preferred to see Boris continue as he was. No one person has ever done so much damage to the Conservative Party in my lifetime. If he had stayed on, it might never have won another election.

Donald And Boris: The Trump Effect

When Donald Trump was the president of America, many of us here in England found him to be an unusual choice as leader of the ‘free world’. His strange hairstyle, the make-up that made him look permanently orange, and not least his regular comments, tweets, and outbursts that seemed to be far from presidential. He had a bad attitude to women, could be rude and insulting on a daily basis, and it was no secret he had an admiration for people he regarded to be ‘strong’ leaders, like Kim in North Korea, and Putin in Russia.

As time went on, he was not afraid to make openly racist remarks about illegal immigrants from centtral America, Mexicans, and Chinese people. He was happy to be offensive to all of his political opponents, and many of his former friends and advisers too. Then during his handling of the pandemic, he went so far as to suggest that scientists and doctors had no idea what they were talking about, and advised people to take horse medicine or inject themselves with bleach instead.

I hold no brief for either side in US politics, but had to admit there were times when I thought Mr Trump was insane.

However, at least 50% of the people in America thought he was marvellous. Many loved him, some even idolised him. For them he could do no wrong, and for most of them he still can’t.

And now we have Boris johnson running Britain. A man who has fathered children with many different women, is openly boastful about his upper-class education, and also has a strange hairstyle. His appearance is unkempt, his speech little more than blathering, often incomprhensible. He has lied to parliament, and to the electorate, and shown no remorse when those lies have been exposed. He has consorted with Russian oligarchs, taken millions of pounds in favours from them, and awarded lucrative contracts to his best friends, costing the taxpayers billions over the last two years.

During the pandemic lockdowns he ignored the rules and laws others were prosecuted for not following, and has recently suppressed reports and investigations into his own behaviour. His friends have been rewarded with top political jobs, Knighthoods, and elevation to the Peerage. He travels around the world embarrassing this country with his bumbling and spouting of nonsense, and he has used Brexit to feather the nests of many already obscenely wealthy businessmen and political colleagues.

Yet at least 50% of the people in this country think he is doing a good job, and want him to stay on as leader. He may be booed or ignored on some walkabouts, but on others he is cheered and adored. Many of his supporters think he is the greatest thing that has happened to this country, and if he is ousted as leader by his political enemies, they will no doubt be calling for him to be reinstated.

I call this ‘The Trump Effect’.

Boris and Ukraine

Remember not so long ago, when the political future of Boris Johnson was hanging by a thread?

The public didn’t trust him, many of his own members of Parliament wanted him gone, and the vultures were circling as others vied for his job.

As for the media, they churned out endless reports about his lies, the Sue Gray investigation, and featured many people who were adamant that Boris had to go, for the sake of the nation, and to reinstill some credibility in the government.

Boris disappeared, claiming a relative with Covid for his self-isolating absence.

He was waiting for the dust to settle.

The same day that he was back on our screens, the media only had one thing to tell us about. Russia was going to invade Ukraine. World War Three was not only a possibility, it was imminent.

Our chief liar got busy, flying around Europe to make it look as if his presence was important in any discussions about the Ukraine situation. He went to Ukraine too, giving away £88 million of our money, and pledging to support the Ukrainians against Putin. He has also been to Poland, Germany, and Belgium, as well as France and America.

His carbon footprint has been disregarded in his efforts to be seen as a world leader, and a man of the hour.

As soon as things seemed about to calm down in Ukraine, Foreign Secretary Liz Truss asserted that Russia was going to invade Ukraine ‘at any moment’. America jumped back onto the invasion bandwagon, and even Emmanuel Macron’s efforts to pour water on the fires faded in a burst of jingoistic fervour on both sides of the Atlantic.

Step in the helpful media, showing out of date photos of Russian troops and tanks, and giving wildly fluctuating estimates of Russian troop numbers on the border with UKraine.

Vladimir Putin had better watch out. Boris the Liar is so desperate to keep his job, he may well get his front bench cronies to invade Ukraine wearing Russian uniforms.

Boris On The Back Foot

In Parliament today, Boris Johnson finally accepted personal responsibility for the parties held at 10 Downing Street during the 2020 lockdowns.

And he apologised unreservedly.

He wasn’t his usual ebullient and truculent self, oh no. To be honest, he looked ill, and there was a sense that he knew his time was almost over. Not only public opinion had forced his hand, also the outrage of members of his own party who had begun to write him off long before he stood up to speak.

Depending on what you read, and where you read it, the absence of Chancellor Rishi Sunak indicated that he is being groomed to take over. Or if you read someone else, Liz Truss is set to become the new Margaret Thatcher, a new ‘Iron Lady’ for the 21st Century.

As far as I am concerned, all Tories are liars and parasites. Whether it is Sunak or Truss, the only change is the hairstyle and clothes.

High time we got shot of them all.

You Couldn’t Make It Up…

A veteran (Conservative) member of Parliament has taken to the newspapers lamenting the fact that he finds it difficult to ‘manage’ on his salary of £81,932 a year. ($111,300)

Tory MP reveals grim reality of living on just £82,000 as he asks for payrise

He compares himself to qualified family doctors, who currently earn more than £100,000 a year from the NHS. ($136,000) He forgets to mention all the years of study at university, medical school, and post-graduate qualifications required to be a family doctor in the UK. The only qualification a member of parliament needs is to get enough people to put a cross next to his or her name on election day.

This is without considering his expenses allowance of course, which is currently an average of £150,000 a year for each member of parliament. ($204,000)
(Family doctors do not get expenses, but he didn’t mention that)

That expenses figure (often greatly exceeded) is supposed to allow for a residence in London, secretarial help, entertainment, and travel. And on top of all this, they get access to a very generous pension scheme, a subsidised restaurant in the Houses of Parliament, and long holidays each year when the parliament closes.

Compare that to the national average salary, which at the moment is estimated to be £29,000 a year. ($39,500) And consider those working on the national minimum wage of £8.91 an hour, ($12) equating to an annual salary of £18,500 for a 40-hour working week. ($21,140)

These parliamentary parasites make me sick to my stomach, and interviews like the one featured in the link go to show that they have no concept of what life is like for ‘normal’ people, and no regard for those living on low wages, or struggling to survive at the bottom of the social ladder in Britain.

I would make them all live on the national average salary, not a penny more. You would soon see them campaigning to increase salaries and hourly rates of pay.

Falling On His Sword

So Matt Hancock, the Health Secretary and government minister, has had to resign.

During his chaotic handling of the Coronavirus pandemic, even some Conservatives in his own party criticised him. It emerged that he had shares in various pharmaceutical companies, and was awarding contracts to supply PPE to companies owned by his friends.

The aborted Test and Trace scheme wasted billions of pounds of public money, and there is speculation that he deliberately held back on adequate support for Care Homes, hoping that the virus would kill off a significant portion of the elderly.

He did not support early vaccination for younger people with disabilities or learning difficulties, but was an advocate of the ‘herd immunity’ idea that probably cost the lives of thousands of people.

Yet none of this forced his resignation.

He continued to enjoy the unqualified support of Prime Minister Boris Johnson, and was frequently praised by his Cabinet colleagues in government for his ‘hard work and dedication’.

His downfall came, as it so often does, because of his attraction to a female adviser that he employed. An old friend from his university days, this woman was employed as an independent adviser at a time when the Civil Service had many well-qualfied and salaried advisers already in place capable of doing her job.

Gina Coladangelo was already a millionaire when employed in that unnecessary role, and married to a multi-millionaire retail shop magnate. Hancock employed her to work for just 20 days in one year, at a fee of £15,000. That’s £750 a day. Not a bad pay rate at all, but she really didn’t need the money.

The real reason was to get her close to him. Very close. He spent public money so he could have sex with a woman he knew.

Unable to keep his hands off his lover during working hours, he was caught on camera kissing and fondling her. Nobody cared that they were having an affair outside of their marriages. What upset everyone was that this was at a time when grandparents were not allowed to hug their grandchildren, and people were dying alone, deprived of the last embrace of a loved one. Families were restricted to meeting in low numbers, and only ouside in a garden, and relatives were forbidden from visiting residents of Old People’s Homes.

Yet the smugly entitled government minister was happy to cuddle up to an ’employee’ who was not in his social bubble, and do a lot more than shake hands with her, or bump elbows.

Even faced with this uproar, he only managed a feeble apology, and asked that his private life be his own affair. But the media and the public were not having it, and the uproar continued, despite Boris standing by the philanderer. That left him with no alternative but to resign.

Good riddance.

Nightingale Hospitals: The Great Lie

Given the recent spike in Covid-19 cases and hospital admissions, the news reports are full of stories about overwhelmed hospitals. Seriously ill patients are being driven from one county to another in the hope of finding a hospital bed for them.

Understandably, the question has been asked. Why not use the purpose built Nightingale Hospitals? They were built in record time earlier this year, with the assistance of the Army. Every bed had access to a ventilator, and they were specifically designed to accommodate Coronavirus patients, thereby allowing other hospitals to continue to see other patients who did not have Covid-19.

The one in London at the Excel Centre cost tens of millions of pounds to convert and equip.

Journalists went there, to see how it was coping with the recent rise in cases.

They found it had been dismantled. It is now mostly an empty building, guarded by security staff who are supposed to stop people finding that out. But they told the reporters anyway. This is what they said.

It has no hospital beds inside.
It has no ventilators or oxygen inside.
It has no operational medical staff inside.

The equipment has apparently been ‘redeployed’ to other areas of the NHS.

https://www.standard.co.uk/news/uk/covid-patients-england-nightingale-hospitals-b538294.html

Yes, it was all a great lie. Built with the help of the Army, and equipped by companies owned by friends of Boris Johnson and his cronies, only to be stripped out at the earliest opportunity. Don’t forget this, when the next election comes around.

Five hundred Intensive care beds just removed without public consultation, at a time when they are needed more than ever before in history.

Boris and his pals should be hanging from lamp-posts.

But nobody seems to care.

I do though.

Chancellor Sunak: Richer Than Queen Elizabeth

The Chancellor of Britain’s Treasury, Rishi Sunak, has a lot to say about how generous the government has been granting furlough payments to workers unable to go into work because of the current pandemic.

He has also praised the temporary increase in Universal Credit, with an aditional £20 a week granted to claimants for the duration of the lockdowns. Is £20 a week more better than nothing? I suppose it is, but believe me, £20 doesn’t buy much in modern Britain, ask anyone.

Mr Sunak receives a ministerial salary of £71,090, and an additional salary of £81,932 as a member of parliament. A total annual salary of £153,022. This is boosted by living in an official residence, having a government car and driver at his disposal, and being able to claim expenses for almost anything that can be attributed to his job.

Let’s face it, £20 is neither here nor there to him. If he dropped a £20 note, I doubt he would bother to bend down to pick it up.

But there is more.

His wife is one of the richest women in the world. In fact, she is worth more than Queen Elizabeth, the current ruler of Great Britain.

And that’s saying something, as the Queen has a massive amount of personal wealth.

And it seems Mr Sunak ‘forgot’ to declare his wife’s vast fortune, as government ministers are compelled to do. So how much are the Sunaks worth?

The following information is from TheLondonEconomic.com

Rishi Sunak is facing renewed questions about his financial affairs after it emerged that his wife and her family hold a multimillion-pound portfolio of shareholdings that are not declared in the register of ministers’ interests.

Akshata Murty – who married the chancellor in 2009 – is the daughter of one of India’s richest men. Her father co-founded tech giant Infosys, and she has shares in the company worth £430 million – making her richer than the Queen.

The ministerial code complex Sunak to declare any financial interests “relevant” to his job that might constitute a conflict of interests. Ministers are also supposed to declare the interests of close family members.

Richer than the Queen
After he became chief secretary to the Treasury in July 2019, Sunak revealed he was the beneficiary of a blind trust – meaning he can’t make decisions about how his money is invested, but can still profit from his investments.

However, according to a Guardian investigation, Sunak’s declarations make no mention of his wife beyond referring to her ownership of a small venture capital company.

But the paper revealed that Murty and her family hold a score of other valuable interests – including a £1.7 billion shareholding in Infosys, which employs thousands of UK staff and has held a number of government contracts.

Other holdings include a reported £900 million-a-year joint venture with Amazon in India, and a direct shareholding in a British firm which runs Jamie Oliver and Wendy’s restaurants in India.

As we say in London, he’s not short of a few quid.

So the next time he traps on about how great it is to get £20 a week more to spend, perhaps take less notice of him.

He is just a criminal in a nice suit.