EU Elections

This Thursday, Britain will be voting in the EU elections, to send more than 70 members to represent our country in the European Parliament.

You might be forgiven for wondering why, as in 2016, we voted as a country to leave the EU. But because the government failed to agree on an exit strategy, we are stuck with the process of sending MEPs to the EU, despite the cost exceeding Β£110 million. To say this is completely unacceptable, is an understatement. It is nothing less than shameful, at a time when some British people are using Food Banks to survive, and the minimum wage here is insufficient to live on.

For only the second time in my life, I will not be voting. Because failing to vote is the only protest I can make, regarding this disrespect of Democracy, and the overturning of the accepted voting processes in this country.

The only word in my head is ‘SHAME’. Shame on Parliament for disrespecting the vote of the majority. Shame on Theresa May, for sucking up to the EU bigwigs. And shame on the Remain dissidents, who have tried to overturn the democratic process since 2016.

This country is now broken, and bitterly divided. And it is all the fault of those who refused to accept a result they didn’t expect. You are no better than fundamentalists, refusing to accept any idea or belief that you don’t adhere to.

Shame on you all. I am disgusted to live in the same country as you.

36 comments

  1. Pingback: EU Elections β€” REDFLAGFLYING – Truth Troubles
    • beetleypete

      Thanks, Roland. It is all falling apart here, and the country is deeply divided too.
      It might all end up with a Labour Government as a ‘backlash’, but I still doubt that.
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Like

      • Heyjude

        I think we are entitled to be grumpy when our politicians behave like spoiled children. Why on earth was this process not given to a cross party committee along with representatives from public health organisations and business leaders. I refuse to vote any more too.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Woebegone but Hopeful

    I find your last words interesting Pete, because I can understand those. Although you will appreciate from previous posts I come from a different ‘neck’ of the Brexit woods and have strong feelings the other way.
    Without wishing to dodge the issue I would like to centre on those last words and this must be the Stalin-lite coming out in me.
    But I feel the British people have to shoulder some of the blame here. We voted 48%-52% and if there was another referendum the result could go the other way and would not solve one damn thing. We are a nation divided, the divisions themselves divided further. We shout at the top of our voices to be heard, without listening. Many bombard the MPs with all sort of ‘heated’ words or correspondence; small wonder they can’t agree on anything. We are still divided as we do our re-enactment of Yates’ ‘Second Coming’ and not stopping to think.
    Opportunists like What’s-His-Name- the EDL lizard and the Eternal Farage make capital (literally) and things are so bad the conservatives think Boris (I’m walking out on you) Johnson would make a credible PM. Meanwhile Corbyn does a worthy, if muted impression of Hitch Hikers’ Guide to The Galaxy’s Vroomfondle and demands rigidly defined areas of doubt and uncertainty.
    Like you I am angry, I don’t listen to or watch any news feeds much lest the innocent device transmitting the words gets damaged.
    I will vote though, I will vote against several parties (we have Plaid Cymru in Wales, so a bit of extra flexibility). I will vote for an old reason which will not leave me, people died so I can vote. I will vote so Farage and the Opportunistic Right will see some aren’t for him. I will vote knowing full well my vote might not make a damn difference in the scheme of things. I will vote because I am angry at the nation too.

    Liked by 1 person

    • beetleypete

      Thanks, Roger. I always voted ‘because people died so I could vote’. But they didn’t die for changing the result because you didn’t like the outcome. And 48-52 is a lot better than some of the general elections we have had in the recent past. I am genuinely tired of it all, and feel that voting has become shamefully ‘rigged’. Boundary changes, skewed reporting by the media, and the real possibility that it is actually going to be ‘fixed’, because they got such a shock in 2016.
      Today, they are offering that second referendum. No surprise to me, as that was always going to happen, once they didn’t accept the vote they got in 2016.
      Standby for a ‘Remain’ landslide. One that was always going to be engineered, at any cost to the so-called Democratic process. I am actually sad, Roger. I think those that died for the right to vote will be turning in their graves. Because they had integrity, and that has been flushed away, blatantly and obviously.
      If I was younger, I would probably build a ‘barricade’ in Beetley, and stand firm against overturning the decision of the people. Whatever the rights or wrongs of that decision, the voting process was all we had. And now it has gone.
      Thanks as always for your comment, and your engagement.
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Woebegone but Hopeful

        I feel this has become more partisan than anything the UK has experienced in a long time, even during the dark days of ‘Thatch’.
        I can accept your viewpoint, because I have seen similar sentiments expressed on the Remain side for the same reasons as you cite.
        These are very difficult times and we are lacking folk of vision and true strength of purpose. Small opportunists scurry about.
        Of late I wish we could just accept anything to get this over with, but as a nation take on the coda….
        Like Galadriel ‘We will diminish…and go into the West’ (as in sunsets, not union of the USA).
        For our time as a ‘power’ has passed, as it must with all nations and empires…
        All the best Pete.
        Take care out there.

        Liked by 1 person

  3. Jim

    Hi Pete. Can I ask who you’ve previously voted for in EU elections? I’ve been Labour in the past, but it’s looking Green now. I’ve not read most of your political posts, so probably missed you explaining the details of what your ideal brexit actually looks like, how it benefits us, and how sure you are that most leave voters want the same.
    It’s a little simplistic to lay all the blame for this mess on the remainers, isn’t it? Didn’t the ERG vote against the deal time and again?
    I feel no shame in defending my kids future against Farage, Yaxley Lennon, Carl Benjamin, Arron Banks, Alexander Nix, Steve Bannon, and Putin. That is what brexit looks like to an increasing number of people, and it’s plain ugly.
    Best wishes x

    Liked by 1 person

    • beetleypete

      I’m not laying all the blame on the Remainers, Jim. I also blame the Tories for mis-managing everything and not having the guts to just Leave, Labour for constantly changing sides, and the far-right Brexit people for making all us Leavers look like Fascists and rednecks. I am happy to more or less lay the blame on everyone except me! πŸ™‚ πŸ™‚

      As for my own reasons for wanting to leave the EU, they go back to 1975, when I voted not to go in. Euro-Capitalism, promotion of big business, globalisation, and running a big ‘club’ that really only benefits France and Germany in the long term. I have laid those reasons out constantly on this blog, so won’t bore readers with them again. For me, it has nothing to do with Empire, Nationalism, Immigration, Muslims, Jobs, or anything else. It is purely political, very personal, and has never changed in my lifetime.

      I can only repeat what I have said before, which is that if Remain had won the vote in 2016, there would have been zero chance of that vote EVER being overturned. I think what passed for Democracy in this country is dead and gone.

      You ask what I voted for previously. I started out voting Communist of course. Then when there were no CP candidates, I voted Labour. During the Blair years, when Labour was betrayed, I sometimes voted Independent, if the candidate got my attention. I have not voted in the most recent EU parliament elections, as I decided I didn’t want to send anyone there to represent me in an organisation I detested.

      Love to you, and all the family, Pete. x

      Like

      • Jim

        Cheers Pete. I really struggle to see brexit as anything other than a far right project; spearheaded and funded by the worst people imaginable. There are more than a couple of pro-brexit parties you could vote for on Thursday, but I understand you’d have to hold your nose whilst doing so.
        I’m sure you didn’t believe the claim on the side of their bus, but many people did, and were also directly targeted with lies about Turkey, immigration and sovereignty. If Remain had won using these tactics (and illegally overspending by 10% using dark money and data), I think you’d have a good case for for overturning the vote as illegal and undemocratic, and presenting a clear roadmap for how we should exit without destoying our manufacturing, NHS, universities, research, and standing in the world. We are a laughing stock because we voted for such self-harm, not because we’re still in the EU.
        We’re unlikely to convince each other, and I’m sorry you feel so hostile to those fighting the far right, but good to read your opinions and to keep in touch. x

        Liked by 2 people

    • beetleypete

      Thanks, Jim. Of course, it is a dilemma for me, to be immediately associated with the Far Right because of a referendum vote. I certainly will not be voting for any of the rightist Leave/Brexit parties, that’s for sure. I don’t actually see the majorityof Remainers as ‘fighting the Far Right’. I think most of them are generally intellectuals and ‘intelligentsia’ who have an overall Liberal opinion about integration and community, based on a starting point of being well-educated, mostly comfortably off, and living in a bubble that rarely includes contact with people who shop in Poundland, or eat food from Greggs.
      I don’t include you in any of that of course. I know you too well. x

      Like

      • Jim

        Far too divisive an idea, Pete. I read books, had a good education (does that make me an intellectual?), and thanks to my background I own my own house. I’m also near broke most of the time, have a massive mortgage debt like many, and use Greggs, Poundland, Aldi and the like. In my very white, mainly working class community (we might as well call it a ‘bubble’), those who are struggling financially all the time have nothing to gain from this mess.
        It might be that back when the vote happened, many remainers didn’t feel they were essentially fighting the far right, but we all know a lot more now, thanks in part to excellent journalism by Carol Cadwalladr and others; who planned it, who funded it, the role of Cambridge Analytica and facebook, what it has already done to jobs and manufacturing, the huge rise in racist hate crime, the effect on the Irish border, the EU workers from fruit pickers to surgeons leaving in droves, the assertion of an emboldened Yaxley Lennon and his fascist thugs and the normalisation of their opinions. Remainers (‘intelligentsia’, working class, even Tories) are certainly still valuing the concept of integration and communities small and large, but it clear now that we are faced with a deep-pocketed, powerfully-backed Fascist project. I can’t speak for all of us, but that’s why I’m fighting.

        Work to do now – stop distracting me!
        -and Green makes a good protest vote (wink wink)

        Liked by 2 people

      • Jim

        It took me a while to get to sleep last night, as I was stewing over the whole mess, but this post of yours in particular. Please forgive any anger, as I write this in the spirit of healthy open debate, and take up your invitation to challenge your strong opinions.

        I’m sure if I read more of your political posts it would clear whether you expected the mentioned foodbanks and sub-minimum wage existence to be a thing of the past after your brexit; all evidence (including the Brexit Party’s own statements have said we should be resilient enough to take a 30 year hit) suggests the opposite. You also talk of the wasteful Β£110m spent on tomorrow’s EU election. Can we put that into context with the Β£4.2 billion no-deal allocation, and the Β£66 billion brexit has cost our economy in the past 3 years (Β£550 million of economic growth missed out on every week)?

        More troublingly, your post points full blame and ‘all the fault’ for this ugly mess on ‘dissident’ ‘fundamentalist’ remainers. Just because you wish to distance yourself from the far-right reality of of the project, it doesn’t mean you can. While you write of a “certain β€˜serenity’ that comes from washing my hands”, what are the rest of us left with?; a huge toxic wave of fascists, energised, empowered, enabled and normalised by YOUR vote. All those crying “I’m never voting again” – this is on you too.

        A few years ago I actually joined the Labour Party to vote for Corbyn. Aside from being proof to myself that even confidently made decisions can be deeply regretted (like that of increasing numbers of Leave voters), I also take responsibility for my action in voting for him, and am keen to correct this mistake by actively supporting though who should replace him (David Lammy is top of my list, but Caroline Lucas for PM).
        Alongside allocating remainers full blame, you heap shame and your disgust. Would you consider taking some responsibility for the current chaos, and re-evaluate whether so heatedly attacking those fighting the far-right is such a good look.

        I’m unaware of whether you both ever discussed Europe, but you and my Dad were very good friends, in fact you knew him longer than I did. He was probably the epitome of the intellectual and ‘intelligentsia’ you refer to, well educated, academic, enjoying free movement to conferences and holiday corners of our European community. Many of his books (which I’m still sifting though, and will be doing so for years to come) are on European history, so he understood what came before the EU. You’ll also remember that he was a school teacher for years, went on to train teachers, and while he would definitely turn his nose up at a Greggs, he would not do the same to those eating it. I’m glad he’s been spared witnessing our country’s rapid descent into division, xenophobia and misplaced island nation patriotism. He loved you very much, would respect your reasons for voting to leave, but would’ve calmly and methodically taken them to bits. I don’t know exactly what he would’ve said or written to you, but I’ll hazard a guess that he would’ve helped you realise how attacking anti-fascists, while perfectly in line with the way you voted, is not necessarily the action of a self-considered leftie.

        Unashamedly yours,
        Jim

        Liked by 1 person

    • beetleypete

      Hi Jim,
      Sorry to affect your sleep. You know how much I loved your Dad, and what close friends we were. But we would never have agreed on politics. He was of course, fair, liberal, and all-encompassing. I came from a very Hard-Left background, and even left the Communist Party because it was against the Soviet Union at the time. So yes, I was intransigent, and to a large extent, remain so. But none of those differences ever affected the relationship between me and Pete, or the deep friendship we shared for all of my adult life, as well as through my teenage years too. He was the best friend I ever had, and I miss him every day.

      I agree that he would have been unhappy that I voted to leave, but I have no doubt he would have understood my deep-seated and long-held beliefs that made me abhor such Euro-capitalism. I know he was both a fan of and advocate for the EU, and saw it as an alternative to a world dominated by the two superpowers of the day. But I could never feel that way about this bloated and essentially corruptible organisation, and would never have been persuaded otherwise.

      I am aware that Brexit is not the answer to so many things, if anything at all. I didn’t believe any of the false promises during the campaign, and still hate the Farages and Rees-Moggs of this world with a vengeance. I am also aware that many (mostly younger) people feel let down by the Leave vote, and worry that it will affect their futures.
      But after a lifetime of political involvement and active engagement, I could only ever have voted with my conscience.

      According to the latest reports, MPs are now going to be given the chance to vote on a second referendum. That seems likely to happen, and a Remain vote is almost certain to be the outcome. So after all this time, it seems they will win after all.

      Love and best wishes to you, and to all the family. Pete. x

      Like

      • Jim

        Wow you type quick! Thanks Pete. I’m grateful that you acknowledge the genuine fears of young people (and actual realities for many of uncertain status). It’s nice to hear about you and Dad discussing Europe and other things, and that we both miss his company and conversations. Did you ever read Koestler’s ‘Scum of the Earth’? I’m reading his copy now, and will send it on to you if not. Like many of his books it’s full of notes, scribbles and train ticket bookmarks.

        I understand that your motivations for voting to Leave are very different to those of Rees Mogg and the like, and you are rightly uncomfortable in wanting the same thing. I’ve not heard any Leaver admit to believing the lie on the bus (have you I wonder?), or even acknowledge how such misinformation most likely swung the deal. You must’ve known it would be these people dictating how it pans out though? – end of the NHS, a low tax economy, cutting of workers rights and ‘red tape’ regulation, ending of freedom of movement etc.
        While we disagree on this issue, I’d rather you didn’t wash your hands of it, but instead argue for a better version of what we have, and accept some responsibility for where we are now.

        Today’s news – I”m not convinced there are enough MP’s with the appetite for a second referendum, nor confident that remain would be on the vote either. I’ve read a little around the idea of a citizens panel, which has been used elsewhere successfully. I don’t know what the outcome would be, but it would hopefully remove the destructive party politics from the debate, and look at the facts objectively and sensibly.

        Best wishes,
        Jim x

        Liked by 1 person

  4. Cousin Ian

    Don’t beat yourself up about not voting! Research suggests that since 1999, less than 50% of all eligible European voters have even been bothered to vote in European Parliament elections! In 2014, only 42.5% of them voted! Despite this, the European Parliament costs around 1.8 billion Euros to run, more than the Parliaments of the UK, France and Germany combined! It’s a gravy train that only exists to ‘rubber-stamp’ the supranational political project of the European Commission’s agenda, to make it look like Europe is a democracy! Vote, or don’t vote, you are not alone!

    Liked by 1 person

    • beetleypete

      Cheers, Ian. I am actually ‘ground down’ by this whole Brexit shambles. It’s as if I have woken up, and finally realised that all voting is little more than a well-organised sham.
      Love to the family, Pete. x

      Like

    • beetleypete

      Oh yes, it is that crazy, Elizabeth. And criminally expensive too!
      It’s because they are going to fix it so we don’t leave. They always were, even before we supposedly ‘won’ that vote.
      I am appalled at how blatant it is, but sadly not at all surprised.
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Elizabeth

        My husband couldn’t believe it when I told him. However, he works for the government here, so he wasn’t too surprised as he thought about it a little longer.

        Liked by 1 person

  5. 2581john

    I agree in part with what you said Pete. I think that not voting is not a protest, it is a gift to those who stole democracy and the vote you cast in the referendum. lt matters not if you like Farage, or his new party. What matters is whether or not you are prepared to use your vote ensure the survival of democracy. You may be ashamed to live in the same country as those who have betrayed everyone, but you still do, and when the name of that country changes to β€˜EU district 9’ that will be in part down to those who allowed their vote to be belittled, ignored, wasted, and finally stolen.

    Liked by 1 person

    • beetleypete

      Cheers, Keith, and thanks for your thoughts. In all honesty, I am no longer prepared to participate in this sham of so-called elections. After more than 50 years of intense political engagement, I realise it has all been ultimately pointless. For or against, all I am doing is participating in a sideshow intended to make the plebs believe they are actually involved.
      So, I say ‘enough’, at long last.
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Like

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