A Busy Week In British Politics

It is only Thursday, but a lot has been happening this week. Mrs May’s attempt to get her pathetic Brexit ‘Deal’ through parliament was voted down with the biggest defeat ever seen in our political history. It’s important to note that. Ever since modern parliamentary democracy has existed in Britain, no government has ever suffered a defeat of anything like this margin. That fact alone should make this week historically memorable. Last night, the government survived a vote of no confidence. No surprise there, as most members of parliament put their jobs and careers before any principles.

But even that overwhelming rejection failed to impress the hapless Prime Minister to do the decent thing, and resign. Rarely has a leader enjoyed less popularity in their own party, and failed so completely in their negotiations with both the EU, the Opposition parties, and their own dissenters. Despite claiming to have worked hard to achieve the best possible deal for leaving the EU, it is apparent to anyone with a functioning brain that all Mrs May has done has been to return from Europe with the deal offered by the other member states, on their own terms, and a ‘take it or leave it’ basis.

I actually feel embarrassed that she doesn’t have sufficient honour to resign, and feels no shame in hanging on to her job, in the middle of this awful mess she has engineered.

Meanwhile, the opposition leader Jeremy Corbyn has been making speeches this morning. This former radical, one-time committed Socialist and reformer, now seems intent on one thing. Becoming the Prime Minister. He has gone back on many of his previous statements and promises, by now suggesting that ‘everything is on the table’, in the event of a Labour win in the election that is not actually happening, except in his mind. He refuses to rule out a second referendum, or the much-lauded ‘People’s Vote’, (same thing, different name) and reprises his own demand of remaining in the European Customs Union at all costs.

So, anyone who wants to really leave the EU has no leadership to look to. Both May and Corbyn were firm Remainers in 2016, and both have broken promises to abide by the will of the people, and ensure that Brexit happens when it should, deal or not. The disgruntled Remain voters have wasted two years using their best efforts to overturn the vote, that very ‘will of the people’ they love to crow about., and they now embrace the ideas that demand a ‘second try’, in the sure hope of getting what they wanted in 2016, which was Britain to stay as a member state of the EU.

We hear a lot about how Leave voters were misled. They were confused, lied to even. They didn’t want to leave with no deal, and most of them would now change their minds, and vote Remain. This is exactly what all this stalling, propaganda, and behind the scenes machinations have been about, for the last two years and more. Sowing the seeds of doubt, reassuring the leaders of EU nations that we won’t actually leave the EU, even if it says so ‘on the tin’. Disregarding that ‘will of the people’, because they have no respect for the people that had that will, and consider them to be inferior beings, unable to understand politics, and make up their own minds. It started on the day the result was announced in 2016, and has gone on unabated every day since.

Things always change, after votes and elections. But that doesn’t mean we get another go, at least not until the elected body has completed its term of office. I was unhappy that the Conservatives scraped through the last election. But can I get another one please? Can I change the result of the last one, because I don’t respect those who voted for it? Of course not. Like it or not, that is the system we live under.

At least it was supposed to be.

26 comments

  1. stalinsmoustache

    Bumpy times, Pete, with a clear bankruptcy of bourgesois ‘democracy’, but perhaps one positive thing that has emerged is that sovereignty – as in making your own decisions without external interference – has once again become a major issue over which people struggle.

    Liked by 1 person

    • beetleypete

      Strange how we as a country campaign for ‘sovereignty’ for others, and even go to war about it. Yet successive governments have been happy to allow the EU to dominate our own laws and control our industries for so long.
      Thanks, Roland.
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Like

  2. Elizabeth

    Chaos certainly seems to have the upper hand at the moment. Both our countries are locked into no-win scenarios. I suppose that given the tectonic shifts both in work and climate it is no surprise. I wish however that cooler heads would arise somewhere and acknowledge that we are heading into the unknown and ought to do it with some thought instead of denial and blame.

    Liked by 1 person

    • beetleypete

      2016 was a year when people in many countries finally chose ‘sides’, and stopped being reasonable. Not only do we have the situations in the UK and America, many less-publicised divisions have sprung up all over Europe. It will give historians a lot to write about, in 100 years. Many compare it to the 1930s, and I see why.
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Heyjude

    At least Trump keeps me amused throughout all this!
    And I am wondering why something this important wasn’t negotiated by a cross party committee from the outside so the compromises could have been ironed out before taking it to the EU member states. Piss up and brewery come to mind. And I am fed up of being told I didn’t know what I was voting for. And I am also fed up of the OH giving me dirty looks whenever Brexit is mentioned – yes, I know that’s a lot of dirty looks!!
    As for Corbyn, I wish he could stop being so aggressive and so smug.
    Like you Pete I think my voting days are done.

    Liked by 1 person

    • beetleypete

      That patronising, that presumption of stupidity, they are what really broke me over this. I know full well that if the Remain side had won by the same margin, there would never have been any debate allowed about staying in, and certainly not a second vote. The accusations of ‘entrenchment’ are correct. All that made me more determined than ever to stick with a ‘side’, and refuse to see the other point of view. I will no doubt still write about goes on, but from now, I refuse to participate in the whole corrupt process.
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. GP Cox

    Your statement – “most members of parliament put their jobs and careers before any principles.” should come as no surprise. The species known as Politician is found throughout the world!

    Liked by 2 people

  5. Eddy Winko

    Its sad to watch, I can only sympathise with the UK as a whole and for all those that wanted to leave. Unfortunately for you all, my prediction that nothing would change, seems more and more likely. And I reckon the EU will still take the extra 39Bn for all the pissing about to get there 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Woebegone but Hopeful

    I can sympathise with you Pete, even if I am something of a Hard-Remainer who reckons we should have subverted the system within, but enough of my dreams (nightmares for some…so sue me).
    Whereas the body politics has shown itself to be unable to cope with the massive challenge of uncoupling from a 40+ ever changing agreement involving many nations, I will also point an admonishing finger at substantial groupings of the peoples of the UK for rabid tribalism and failing to embrace the fact that after the first year co-operation and compromise while working towards AN organised exit (that was the result) was the only way out.
    Instead trenches have been dug, flags have been waved,the social media past-time of ‘You’re an idiot’ was indulged in on FaceBook etc , the favourite rag (sorry ‘news’ paper) was purchased to be waved about like some religious tract and anyone without a pale skin and a local accent was blamed.
    The signs were there and WE the People ignored them and squandered the chances.
    ‘WE’ are as much to blame as Westminster. ‘WE’ have thrown away the last chance at a reasonable future for those born within the past 25 years.
    (I will now step down from my lectern)

    Liked by 1 person

    • beetleypete

      Nice to see you again, Roger, and I appreciate your own thoughts. Even though I could have guessed what they might be. 🙂
      The handling of this whole issue has taken me out of the game, in terms of involvement. I doubt I will ever bother to vote in a General Election or Referendum (sorry, People’s Vote) again.
      Best wishes as always, Pete.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Woebegone but Hopeful

        Again I can sympathise Pete.
        I too have reached a washing my hands (or in biblical terms shaking the dust from your sandals)
        By good happenstance being in Wales we have a Plaid Cymru option, which since it has shed in right-wing ‘nationalist’ element is an option.
        Thus will we and my English wife vote for them. Not so much because they have all the answers, but the old-fashioned ‘least worse alternative’ option.
        I have a sentimental tug to vote to. My dad who would be 95 (died in 2008) was wounded in WWII and on reflection also had PTSD; my wife’s father died when she was 15 from TB as a result of near fatal pneumonia when serving in the Army in WWII (always the hidden casualties of War). There is no rational explanation for this. we just vote for them so what they went through as some reason…it’s our ‘thing’.
        Meanwhile in the Dis-United Kingdom I think of Yates’ ‘Slouching to Bethlehem’
        Keeping on keeping on man.
        Imagine us in ten years time proudly wearing T-Shirts:
        ‘Hey we’re the folk who survived Thatcher and the Mess They Made of Brexit’

        Liked by 1 person

    • beetleypete

      I tend to agree with people voting for Nationalist options in countries where they exist. Not because I am remotely nationalistic, but because I have always thought that Scotland and Wales should be fully independent countries, (and Northern Ireland should just be part of Ireland) left to manage their own affairs, and sort out their own problems. In fact, I would be happy to see this country return to a regional structure, as it once was in the days of Wessex, Northumbria, and so on.
      I feel that I have no more in common with someone from Wrexham or Middlesborough, than I do with people from Spain or Cambodia.
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Woebegone but Hopeful

        I am wary of nationalism because of the forms it can take. As with any movement there are dangers of a fringe taking over.
        Back in the 1970s I could find myself being ostracised in some parts of Wales for not being able to speak welsh and particularly having a south wales accent….At that stage I started calling myself ‘British’
        That said a federal system where regions of the UK run their own shows would be a better system for these isles; it may come in the fracturing we are now heading for, though the transition period will be painful for……
        Yes, you got it, the folk at the bottom of the money pile!
        The only pain the Johnsons (Odious B) and the Rees-Moggs of this world will suffer is a slight delay in supply of their favourite claret at their favourite hog-hole.
        Take care Pete…

        Liked by 1 person

  7. toritto

    Don’t know if its worse there or here Pete. Makes one almost glad to be old. I guess my major concern Is that the alternative to the EU winds up looking like Europe in the ’30s. Given history, its hard to picture a peaceful Europe of independent nation states. I can only envision a Europe dominated by Germany and the Russian bear with the U.K still tied to the Americas. The history of my lifetime dictates the view. And we are no longer the America of the past. Hungary has already gone semi-fascist. Who would be next?

    Best of luck and regards.

    Liked by 1 person

    • beetleypete

      You are on the right lines, Frank. Far Right parties are popular everywhere in Europe to some degree, except in the UK. But I see no evidence that the EU has any effect on that. It also gives a potential platform to Fascist MEPs, elected by those member states. I am past caring about the machinations of the EU, and just want out of it, whatever the consequences.
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Liked by 1 person

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