The UK Election: The Post-Mortem

So what are we to make of our election results?

Theresa May made some wrong moves, and threw away one of the biggest leads in decades.

The tax on property, to allow for social care in later life.
Big mistake.

Austerity policies.
Big mistake.

Not attending any televised debates.
Big mistake.

Underestimating the UK electorate.
Big mistake.

What about Jeremy Corbyn, written off, before the election?

He came across as sincere and passionate.
Huge positive.

He said things that people wanted to hear.
Huge positive.

He attracted the votes from disillusioned elderly people, and first-time young voters.
Huge positive.

Many people believed his Socialist rhetoric.
Amazingly positive.

He secured his position as leader of the opposition Labour Party.
Massive positive.

UKIP all but disappeared from the political scene, and their leader resigned. So much for the far right, in UK politics.

The Liberals had some gains, but nothing remotely significant.
Situation normal for them, after the fuss has died down.

Scotland rejected the second independence referendum, and the Nationalist path, with a loss of 30% of Nationalist seats.

Theresa May is unlikely to ride out this storm, and almost certain to either resign, or be ousted.

The knives are out in Westminster, and the sides are forming. She is in neither camp.

Corbyn cannot form a government, but a second election in the short term looks very likely.

That was one hell of a day, in British politics!

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22 comments

  1. Eddy Winko

    We had a bit of a celebration here in Poland, considering that ‘we’ are a Brit who lost the right to vote, a Pole who could never vote and two Irish who have who’s opinion of the British is less than favourable, Corbyn managed to capture a desire within us all to try and change a messed up society. I just hope he gets the chance to try again soon.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. PJR

    Wonderful, encouraging result – but as a natural pessimist worry that it is teasing us with hope. “We” – anyone rejoicing at humiliation of Tory dictators and resurgence of democratic socialism – might be looking forward to another general election, but won’t that bring out wavering Conservatives, and anyone else horrified by the thought of Corbyn as PM becoming a reality?
    I think all the centre and left of centre parties would have to pull themselves together and unite with each other to ensure our liberation.
    And coalitions/pacts don’t go down well in this country, so the Opposition parties could still deliver us into decades of Conservative hell. Theresa May’s government – pro-hard Brexit, anti-NHS, anti-State education, anti-welfare, anti-free entry to museums, pro-fox hunting and even anti-police, for heavens’ sake – STILL got re-elected!
    Reformation of electoral system?
    Corbynite ambivalence about Brexit turned me off.
    You know by now that I am politically naive; I shouldn’t be wasting anyone’s time commenting here (inane blogging again).
    I want a progressive alliance, that will keep us in Europe and get rid of “austerity” (AKA taking from the poor to enrich the rich). Electoral reformation? And definitely no more opinion polls disguised as democratic referenda – it’s easy to democratically oppose a government, but not the “Will of the People” myth, invented by history’s winners to suppress opposition.
    Re: proportional representation – not favoured by Labour – please explain why to me? And what was Michael Foot’s position?
    He was the tragic Labour hero of my youth, BTW – more high-minded and sympathetic than Corbyn, I think.

    Liked by 2 people

    • beetleypete

      Proportional representation as a reform of the electoral system has never found favour with the main parties. If we had that system, coalition parliaments and squabbling would be the norm. Think of Italy, as one example. It would also have returned a large number of UKIP members of parliament in 2015, based on the share of the vote. As far as I am aware, Michael Foot was not in favour of it either. He may well have been more high-minded too, but he was painfully out of touch with the reality of modern politics at the same time. He came too late to leadership, unfortunately. I saw him speak on a couple of occasions, and found myself feeling sorry for him, to be honest.
      As for a second election, I agree that we have to bear in mind the fact that the Conservatives got a considerable majority vote, in terms of the actual numbers of votes. Fear of Corbyn being the Prime Minister might well inspire those who didn’t vote to take any option against that possibility. But we will never know, unless we get the chance to try.
      Never say that you commenting here is a waste of time, as your comments are always of great interest to me.
      Best wishes, Pete. x

      Liked by 1 person

  3. fragglerocking

    Was looking for this post all day ๐Ÿ˜Šand here it is. Spot on Pete, though I do believe she will hang on to her position. It’s a poisoned chalice and I can’t see anyone else wanting to take on the responsibility of the clusterfuck that’s about to happen.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Doug (FindingPoliticalSanity.com)

    You forgot… “She held hands with U.S. President Trump.”
    She gave up a lot for Queen and country. (You think she washed her hands?)

    Liked by 1 person

    • beetleypete

      Thanks, Felicity. I hope that Labour manage to continue to engage with the youth vote in the same way. That might well change the shape of UK politics, in years to come.
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Like

  5. toritto

    Hi Pete! I’ve been looking for your take all day! Think she can survive by sucking up to the Unionists? Agreed that another election is likely in the short term. Good day for the Reds!

    Regards from sunny Tampa

    Liked by 1 person

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