The DPRK calls the US bluff.

Whatever you might think about North Koreans, they are nothing if not resilient.
Faced with the threat of American action against them, their response has been bullish, to say the least. Their Foreign Minister has declared that his country will launch a ‘preemptive nuclear strike against the USA’, if they detect any possibility of an attack against them from America.

Those are serious words indeed, even if they are unlikely to be backed up by the action mentioned in them. I am reminded of a professional poker game; bluffers taking on the bluffers. Both sides know that the other is bluffing, but who is actually prepared to take that chance, when push comes to shove?

This small country, with a population of 29 million, its people generally impoverished, and having one thing to show to the world, Pyongyang, has taken a firm stand indeed. On one hand, it could signal their total destruction. On the other, it could guarantee them a place on the world stage.

So. Who blinks first? Fascinating.

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15 comments

  1. fragglerocking

    I wonder how come ‘we’ (USA,NATO) decide who gets to have nukes, there are 9 countries globally that have them, the main ones of course being the US and Russia, but so do India and Pakistan and we don’t worry about them. From North Korea (and Iran come to think of it) point of view it must seem a bit hypocritical for the USA to tell them off for missile testing or building their own weapons, when they are sitting on 7.300 warheads! Not that I personally want them to have nukes, but then I don’t think anyone should have.

    Liked by 1 person

    • beetleypete

      I agree that nobody should have them. It seems to come from the mad idea that ‘we’ are the good guys, and we say who is allowed to have them. Like one of those gangs at school, but a lot more dangerous. If other countries manage to get the technology, (albeit from Russia, spying, or by subterfuge,) then we only have ourselves to blame.
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Liked by 1 person

    • beetleypete

      When the ‘Cuba Crisis’ was at its height, we had ‘air raid’ instructions in school, about how to ‘look away from the windows’, and ‘hide under our desks’. I was only 10 at the time, and even I knew we would never survive. The school was just south of Tower Bridge, right in the initial blast range of an air burst above the city.
      The feeling then was it would be an all-out nuclear war right from the start, and everyone was talking about the famous ‘Ten-minute warning’. Most people appear to be a lot less worried now, at least in Beetley!
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. lobotero

    Like I said in my reply on IST….it is like 2 mountain gorillas beating their chests and growling at each other….and then they split a banana and make nice. Lil Kim has nothing to lose and they act like it…..let’s hope someone has an idea on how to use diplomacy….threats will not work IMO….chuq

    Liked by 1 person

  3. democratizemoney

    My thinking is that nations like Cuba, Iran, Syria, Venezuela, and North Korea have painted the United States as an enemy (the great Satan). They have done so, secure in the knowledge that they are too small for the US really to take notice and risk a broader war with, for instance, Russia or China if the US acts. Then too, their belligerence and using the US as a foil to distract from their domestic problems, could safely be ignored. However, both Iran and North Korea with stated goals to destroy the US and their “nuclear” and ICBM claims have moved them to the front burner of US attention regardless of who is in the White House. Unfortunately for them and us, the pestilence is probably not much more stable than Kim. The game has changed.
    Warmest regards, Theo

    Liked by 1 person

    • beetleypete

      Thanks for your thoughts, Theo. The old game has indeed changed. Different leaders in charge all over, and more of that playground feel too. “My Dad is bigger than your Dad” springs to mind. Hopefully, the current Chinese leadership will be taking a very different approach this time round.
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Like

    • beetleypete

      I think it is fair to say that the country is poor. Outside of major cities, there is little infrastructure, and the DPRK has few export markets to earn income for the country. The sanctions may hurt them in some ways, but having 60 years of dynastic rule has also not helped them progress. They have a trade deficit of around $1 billion a year, and over 75% of their exports go to China; their main customer, and former ally.
      Although I am in favour of Communist/Socialist countries being left alone to live in their own system, (as you know) I do not think that the Kim family necessarily represents the right path for the DPRK.
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Like

      • Prole Center

        You surprise me, Pete. You think the Kims are to blame for the lackluster state of the North Korean economy and you are against dynasties, as you put it? Are you also against the Castros? We’ve disagreed before about political forms and the role or importance of elections and voting. I think I’ve made clear that I believe democracy as it’s commonly understood to be nothing more than a scam.

        With respect,
        PC

        Liked by 1 person

    • beetleypete

      I think that the Castro ‘dynasty’ has done much for Cuba, because of the advances they have brought to that country. I would place the Kim family alongside the Ceausescu family, in that it does less for the people and the country, rather more for the ruling elite. Huge showy buildings and immense parades also featured heavily in Romania, and we know how that ended. So I do blame the Kim family to a large extent, I suppose.
      Then again, PC, we can’t agree on everything!
      Best wishes as always, Pete.

      Liked by 1 person

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